FAQs

Disclaimer: TESOL France does not warrant that the information provided here is comprehensive, complete, or otherwise reliable. TESOL France does not provide teacher certification, academic counseling, career counseling, legal assistance, or legal advice. TESOL France hopes the information is helpful but does not intend it to substitute for professional assistance.

 

Questions...

 
 

A- TESOL France, the basics


1. How can I meet other teachers? How can I continue to develop my professional skills?

Don't hesitate to get in touch with us at TESOL France here to find out about our upcoming events. It's a great way to meet other teachers from all the different teaching sectors, to learn new techniques, to ask questions, and to refresh your ideas.

2. What is TESOL France?

TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) France, an affiliate of TESOL International. and IATEFL, is a non-profit organization (Association 1901) of teachers of English in France and is run entirely by volunteers. Its purposes are to stimulate professional development, to disseminate information about research, books and other materials related to English, and to strengthen instruction and research. We regularly organize high quality events which are opportunities to keep up-to-date with current trends in teaching, to share knowledge and experiences and to meet and network with other teachers. TESOL France operates through an Executive Committee responsible for, amongst other things, organizing events, publications and membership. But we also have correspondents in the different sectors (primary, university, etc.) who keep us informed of the preoccupations and needs of their sector.  
3. What is TESOL France's postal address?

Telecom ParisTech
TESOL France
46 rue Barrault
75634 Paris Cedex 13

See directions and map here.  
4. What is TESOL France's e-mail address?

Please use the contact page here to better direct your inquiry.
   

B- TESOL France Membership and Advertising


1. Who can join TESOL France?

Membership is open to everyone involved in the English Language Teaching (ELT) industry. Our members include teachers, lecturers, teacher trainers, academic managers, researchers, authors, publishers, testing agencies, company founders, and institutions.  
2. How do I become a TESOL France Member?

You can find membership information and the online form here. Fill it out the online form and then send the membership fee to:
Telecom ParisTech
TESOL France
46 rue Barrault
75634 Paris Cedex 13

Important information for renewing members:
1) If you have your log in details for the Members Section (top left), simply log in. 
If you don't have your password, simply click on "recover password" and it will be emailed to you. If you don't get the retrieval email, please first check your spam folder.
 
2) Once logged in, go to "status and invoice". Please click "renew".  It's very important to do this every time you renew otherwise your membership cannot be reactivated. 

3) Send us your membership payment.  If your name is different than what appears on the cheque, please write your name on the back of the cheque. 

Wire Transfers
We do not accept online credit card payments. Wire transfers are possible.  If you have received an invoice or request for payment from TESOL France for membership, stand booking or sponsorship, our bank details are available upon request following a membership request on our website and email email to TESOL France. When making the wire transfer, please be sure to include the Invoice Number, Membership Number and/or your name on the wire transfer form.
back
 
3. What happens once I send in my registration?

Once your membership fee has been received, we will activate your membership. You will receive an email confirming your membership. It will include your membership log-in details for the Membership Section of our website.  You will also be added to the TESOL France Jobs List (emailed every Friday). When the next TESOL France magazine, The Teaching Times, is printed this will be sent to you by post.  Please ensure your postal information is correct and kept up-to-date in the Members Section of the website.  
4. How much does TESOL France membership cost?
  • Regular member: 49 euro a year
  • Benefactor: 55 euro a year
  • Student, unemployed, retired: 27 euro a year with proof of status*.
*Proof of your status is required to qualify for the reduced 27-euro rate. You must include a photocopy of your proof of status with your payment. If not, your membership will not be processed and your cheque will be returned to you.

Proof of status means:
For students: A student card clearly showing current student status (double sided).
For the unemployed: a certificate or statement from the French Pôle-Emploi unemployment office.
For the retired: A photocopy of your ID card proving you are over 65 years old OR a photocopy of your pension statement.
back
 
5. I'm a student, but my student card is from a university outside of France.

This isn't a problem. You can join TESOL France at the reduced rate providing your student ID is valid for the forthcoming academic year. Please include a photocopy of your student card (both sides) with your TESOL France registration.
Student Price: 27€ a year.
 
6. I want to become a member but I live outside France. What do I get?

You will receive the weekly TESOL France Jobs List emails and news about the association. You will also three issues of our TESOL France magazine, The Teaching Times. Of course, you can attend any of our events free of charge for the entire year whenever you come to France.  
7. What is a TESOL France Supporter and how much does it cost?

TESOL France Supporters are commercials establishments that choose to provide financial assistance to the association. They include, but are not limited to, publishers, bookshops, testing agencies, online companies, and E-learning agencies. Supporter status runs for 12 months from receipt of payment.
 
For 173€ a year, TESOL France Supporters receive the following benefits:
  • 20% discount on advertising in our Teaching Times Magazine
  • 20% discount on advertising on our website
  • 20% discount on stands at our annual Colloquium
  • Plus the usual benefits of membership: free magazines, free attendance to all events
To become a supporter go here.  
8. Can language schools or university language departments sign up their teachers? How much does it cost?

Your language school and or/department can benefit from plenty of exposure through pedagogical representatives. What better way to increase teaching quality at your school than to sign your teachers up for TESOL France membership.
The 173€ registration includes:
  • 4 teacher memberships -- you may distribute them to whomever you wish. You can also add them to the Members Section of our website.
  • Subscription to our magazine, The Teaching Times
  • Free entrance to our Colloquium and all of our regional events throughout the year.
  • Additional Membership cards: 29€ each
 
To sign up your institution: 
  • FIll in the online membership form for institutions here.
  • After completing the online form, please send a cheque or invoice request (bon de commande) to the Treasurer who can be contacted here. We will send an invoice either to you or your finance department. Please indicate in your email the exact information that should appear on the invoice.  Thank you.
  • Membership is activated upon receipt of payment. 
 
9. Who should I make cheques out to?

TESOL France.

Wire Transfers
We do not accept online credit card payments. Wire transfers are possible.  If you have received an invoice or request for payment from TESOL France for membership, stand booking or sponsorship, our bank details are available upon request following a membership request on our website and email email to TESOL France. When making the wire transfer, please be sure to include the Invoice Number, Membership Number and/or your name on the wire transfer form.  
10. Can I pay TESOL France registration using a foreign cheque?

Due to high bank charges, we are unable to accept cheques from non-French bank accounts; if you are visiting from overseas, we can accept cash on arrival or wire transfer (we just ask that you cover the international transfer fees as well).   
11. What does TESOL France membership include?

With TESOL France you make professional connections and create new / develop existing networks in the teaching field.
 
TESOL France membership includes:
  • Workshops and other high-quality Special Interest Groups almost every month related to teaching English.
  • An annual Colloquium and Spring Day.
  • A magazine, The Teaching Times with plenty of teaching tips sent by post three times a year.
  • Endless networking opportunities with fellow teachers and publishers.
  • Leadership opportunities with our Executive Committee.
  • Weekly emails from the TESOL France Jobs List.
 
12. I haven't received my membership card yet. What should I do?

We no longer send paper membership cards. If you have not yet received your membership login details, first check your spam folder (perhaps the activation email landed in there). Then let the Membership Team know by sending the membership coordinator a message here.  
13. I can't remember / lost my membership number, what should I do?

If you have your log in details for the Members Section (top left), simply log in.  If you don't have your password, simply click on "recover password" and it will be emailed to you. If you don't get the retrieval email, please first check your spam folder.  Once logged into the website, you will be able to find all of your membership information there.  
14. I am already a member of another ELT organization (e.g. TESOL International). Does that count towards membership for TESOL France?

While TESOL France is an affiliate of TESOL International, and IATEFL, membership in one does not constitute membership in the other. Separate TESOL France registration is required to be a member of TESOL France.  

C- TESOL France Events


1. Who can take part in your annual Colloquium? Do I need to be a TESOL France member?

The Colloquium is open to non-members, and it is possible to register in advance by filling out an online form for the event (usually online by September). The fee for nonmembers is 49€ and membership to TESOL France, if you wish.  If you wish to be a member, please be sure to fill out the membership form before you come to the Colloquium.  In short, to become a member and attend the colloquium, you'll have to fill out two separate online forms.  
2. What is included in the Colloquium registration?
  • Entrance to all conference workshops, talks and presentations (there are up to 50 to choose from)
  • Coffee breaks.
  • Opening cocktail on Friday.
  • Conference information package, including programme.
  • Your own copy of the TESOL France magazine, The Teaching Times.
  • Extensive opportunities to meet publishers.
  • Plenty of networking possibilities.
back
 
3. Is lunch provided during the Colloquium?

Attendees are responsible for making their own restaurant arrangements.  
4. Who can take part in your workshops and Spring Day? Do I need to be a TESOL France member?

You do not have to be a member to come to our events.  There is a non-member fee for our workshops and Spring Day. Non-member prices are usually 8€ per person for weekend workshops. To register for any of our events please visit the web pages devoted to those regions or events.  
5. What is included in the Workshop or Spring Day registration?
  • Entrance to the workshop and speaker sessions.
  • Networking opportunities.
  • New insights into teaching English.
back
 
6. I'm interested in leading a workshop. Who should I contact?

If you would like to attend or lead a workshop, or simply have suggestions for future topics, please contact us here and we will put you in touch with that region's Coordinator.  
7. Does TESOL France arrange accommodation for Colloquium or Workshop attendees?

We are unable to make any accommodation arrangements for attendees of our events. The organizers therefore cannot be held responsible for any cancellation costs or other costs incurred. All bookings made are between the individuals and the hotels. We suggest you take out insurance to cover any cost you may have due to cancellations. Hotel info is available on our  website.  
8. How do I submit a paper for your Colloquium?

TESOL France usually announces the Call for Papers in the spring for Annual Colloquium. We suggest you read the Colloquium Frequently Asked Questions here before submitting a proposal. Prospective speakers are requested to complete the Call for Papers form available on our website.  
9. Should I submit a theory- or practice-based workshop or paper?

TESOL France members have generally preferred seminars that have been more practical than theoretical.  Please visit the Colloquium Frequently Asked Questions page for more information.  
10. Can anyone submit a paper for a workshop or the Colloquium?

Paper submissions are open to everyone in the language-teaching world.
Whether you are a veteran in the field, or just starting out, if you have something to share, we want to hear from you. We would just ask that you respect the topic of the event.  Please visit the Colloquium Frequently Asked Questions page for more information.  
11. As a speaker do I need to pay a registration fee or join TESOL France?

TESOL France charges a small fee for speakers to attend the Colloquium.  Please visit the Colloquium Frequently Asked Questions page for more information.
However, speakers are not asked to pay to speak at our weekend workshops.  
12. Can TESOL France sponsor my trip to France in order for me to give a paper?

TESOL France can only help towards costs for Plenary speakers. However TESOL France can provide an official letter of invitation to speakers requiring a visa for entry into France. The letter can be used in support of their application for visa and therefore submitted to the French embassy in their country of origin. Please visit the Colloquium Frequently Asked Questions page for more information.  
13. When is the Colloquium Call to Papers deadline?

The deadline varies from year to year, but it is generally around the end of May.  
14. How do we go about being an Exhibitor or Sponsor during the Colloquium?

In addition to presentations and workshops, our Colloquium will also include exhibitions by publishers, examination bodies, training providers and more. If you would like to exhibit at the conference or sponsor a particular aspect of the conference please contact us here  

D- Teacher Training in France


1. Does TESOL France deliver teaching certificates?

TESOL France does no deliver teaching certificates. See question: How can I become qualified to teach English as a foreign language in France? below for schools in France that offer teacher training.  
2. What is with the Alphabet Soup! ESL, TEFL, ESP, TESOL, etc.

Ironically, the English language teaching world has a bewildering array of abbreviations and acronyms, many of which mean the same thing, and most of which have no official significance. A basic list of these initialisms can be found on this website: FAQ about TEFL.  
3. How can I become qualified to teach English as a foreign language in France?

The most common teacher training courses in France are the CELTA, DELTA, and MA in 2nd language learning. The CELTA is for teachers who would like a refresher course or for people with no experience teaching. The DELTA is for teachers with a minimum of two years teaching experience who want to deepen their knowledge of language learning, teaching, and of the English language. Both the certificate and diploma are from UCLES (the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate), but taught at the schools below.  
4. Which certification is best?

According to FAQ about TEFL, it's important to realize that the simple terms "TEFL" and "TESOL" have no official significance whatsoever. Consequently, the terms "TEFL Certificate" or "TESOL Certificate" do not of themselves endow a certificate with recognition. The best TEFL/TESOL training courses are externally validated, ie they are vetted and checked by a body that is officially recognized such as UCLES (University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate). A good question to ask any course provider, therefore, is: "Is your course externally validated, if so by whom and if not why not?" The most widely recognized certifications are an MA in Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language, the Cambridge CELTA, DELTA and the Trinity CertTESOL.  
5. How difficult are Certification Courses?

While each course is different, there is a great deal of work involved in learning the basics (get ready for alphabet soup ESL; ESP; ELT etc). The CELTA course, for example, is considered to be a very tough course that some find just too difficult. The shorter the class can also be more intensive. So, in your search for certification, be sure to think about your own learning style.  
6. Can you recommend a good teacher training centre in France?

TESOL France strives to remain open-minded concerning the quality of teacher training in France. The schools named here are not for advertising purposes, but are recommendations from our fellow members.
  • ESOL Strasbourg offers Cambridge ESOL accredited CELTA and DELTA courses.
  • ILC France offers the Cambidge accredited CELTA course.
 
7. Can you recommend a good online correspondence TEFL course?

According to their website I-to-I specializes in providing short course TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) training.
About.Com's Kenneth Beare wrote an informative review of I to I.  
8. I'm looking to take a TEFL course in Spain, China, Italy, UK, or elsewhere. Can you please provide information or recommendations on accredited courses or schools?

TESOL France does not have any information on teacher training schools outside of France. For information, we recommend visiting TESOL websites around the world: find a comprehensive list on www.tesol.org.  
9. Are there any courses available in France that will lead to DELTA certification?

ESOL Strasbourg offers Cambridge ESOL accredited CELTA and DELTA courses.
 
10. I heard that one must be TEFL Certified in order to teach English in France. Is this true?

According to Amber Foster, author of the article, Teaching English in France: A Step by Step Guide to Success, "I am constantly asked if you need a TEFL certification of some kind before going to France. The answer is simple: Yes! This is especially true for people who lack crucial work experience. [In general, no matter which certificate you earn], employers want to see real, in-class teaching hours under your belt. Which means don't sign up for those Internet training courses that promise you a certificate in only a few hours. Research [the courses] and find one that will be recognized internationally. A great site for advice on this subject is www.tefl.com where you will find this and other useful information for current and prospective English teachers.  
11. Are the correspondence courses as good as the full time ones?

TESOL France does not know the answer to how correspondence or distance degrees compare to classroom courses in the eyes of potential employers, as the field is too varied to ascribe a single opinion to all employers. We recommend contacting some potential employers to ask about the types of degrees they prefer.  

E- Teaching and Working in France


1. What is it like to teach in France?

Teaching English in France has its ups and downs. But with all the hard work, both administratively and pedagogically, it can be quite a rewarding experience. According to Graham Banks "Whilst 'skills and drills' play a part, it is the ability of the teacher to act as a communicator, actor, psychologist, sociologist and counselor that provides the optimal conditions for learning." Because each teacher's experience is different, we'd like to refer you to the articles below, written by those who know best - the ones in the trenches.
 
Teaching English in France: A Step by Step Guide to Success, by American, Amber Foster, who says she's proof that Americans and other non-EU nationals can get a work visa in France.
 
France: A blessing in disguise English teaching work is easy to come by [for UK nationals] in the French capital, writes Kevin Rigdy, but don't expect astronomical rewards.

Teaching English Offers the Most Opportunities American, Susan Griffith, discusses teaching English in France and the rest of Europe - including freelancing, getting contracts, promoting one's self and some schools in France that may employ Americans on a short-term basis.

Teaching English in France Mike Hoinville offers some insight to UK nationals.

Finding a Job Teaching English in France Elisabeth Schneiter discusses some of the realities of teaching adults in France and the growing demand to teach them.

Teaching English? It's all French to me Graham Banks paints a less-than-honorable picture of teaching in language schools.

A collection of more articles about teaching English in France.  
2. Can you recommend websites on life in France?

Paris Insights and Volterre-Fr these are two comprehensive sites on life in France run by our original TESOL France webmaster, Linda Thalman. Anglo Info a local business directory with 5,733 listings of English-speaking businesses and services in France.
Americans in France a resource for people that would like to live or travel in France.
Craig's List The postings for Paris.  
3. Do I have to speak French to work in France?

It is very helpful speak functional French if you want to live, work, teach and enjoy France to the fullest. Some arrive here with very little and then pick it up.
Worth noting: English teachers have an advantage over other professionals because they are often viewed as walking bilingual dictionaries thus they can pick up the language more quickly.  
4. How is the pay?

According to a 2015 study co-conducted by TESOL France, hourly rates are notoriously low. Out of 800 respondants for the study, we found 1/3 earn less than 20€ gross/hr and a quarter of those who derive more than 70% of their income from teaching, earning the minimum wage (currently set at €13,500 net a year) or less.

Hourly rates for self-employed trainers indicated a huge disparity, with those at the top billing more than €50/hr. Rates at the lower end of the scale tended to be around €30/hr.

In the final section of the survey, respondents listed their principle concerns. Over 50% stated working conditions had deteriorated. This is further aggravated by lack of security, which in turn is due to the prevalence of fixed term and zero-hour contracts as well as a cap on the number of hours a year trainers are entitled work under such contracts.

For self-employed trainers, lack of income security and limited benefits are major concerns. Finally, the precarious nature of the profession means that few qualify for a full state pension and are forced to continue working past retirement age.  
5. Can TESOL France proofread my CV, or just read it to see if it's ok?

TESOL France does not offer career counseling or CV proofreading services.  
6. I'm looking for a teaching job. Can TESOL France pass on my CV to schools and universities?

Unfortunately, TESOL France is in no position to recruit or refer teachers to organizations. However, if you become a member of TESOL France, you are automatically added to the TESOL France Jobs List - a weekly emailing of job offers we recieve.  
7. I am an American looking for information about getting working papers and a job in France.

While we belong to a large teaching network our main goal is not to find teaching jobs for potential applicants. Therefore, the answer to this question is not an easy one.
The short answer is, if you are not:
  • Married to a French national
  • A European resident
  • A US Citizen who has lived in France for an eternity and managed to get grand-fathered into the system,
obtaining work papers is next to impossible. And even when you fall into these three categories, there is no way around the headache-yielding French administration. With working papers you will find countless jobs all with varying hourly or full-time salaries and working conditions.
 
French Teaching Assistantships an opportunity for Americans with no visa. According to their information package: "The French Ministry of Education and the Cultural Services at the French Embassy offer between 1,000 and 1,700 teaching assistant position in French primary and secondary schools and in Instituts universitaires de formation des maîtres (IUFMs) in all regions of France and the DOM-TOMS to persons who fulfill the following requirements:
  • You are an American citizen (or have a Green Card). If you have a Green Card, you must have spent your high school years in the United States.
  • You are between 20 and 34 years of age as of October 1 of the year you wish to go to France.
  • You are currently pursuing (at least your third year of university) or have already attained a college degree
  • You are proficient in French. Students without a major or minor in French but with a basic proficiency (about 3 semesters) in French can apply. If you have never taken classes, but lived abroad in a francophone country, this is usually considered enough French.

This is a unique opportunity to:
  • Spend between 6-9 months in France with a monthly stipend
  • Have a privileged insight into contemporary France
  • Master the French language through linguistic immersion
  • Gain valuable teaching experience
back
 
8. What are the different types of job status for teachers in France?
  • Continuing Education English Teacher - the majority of native speakers take on this role. It involves being hired (part or full time) to teach professionals assigned to you through language schools. Working papers and resident visas are most often required. If you are not 1) married to a French national, 2) a European resident, or 3) a US Citizen who has lived in France for an eternity and managed to get grand-fathered into the system, obtaining work papers is next to impossible. And even if you fall into these three categories, there is no way around the headache-yielding French administration.   With working papers you will find countless jobs all with varying hourly or full-time salaries and working conditions. The Continuing Education field also tends to hire native speakers only but TESOL France is working hard to change this mentality in France.   Meccas for job-hunters include the American Church in Paris which even offers career forums for job-seekers and the American Cathedral in Paris. Both have notice boards crammed with employment opportunities, courses and housing listings. Most expat meeting places in Paris distribute the free bilingual newsletter France-USA Contacts www.fusac.org that comes out every other Wednesday. Its classified ads are best followed up on the day the paper appears. It is also a good place to put your own "Work wanted" ad.
 
  • Full-time Continuing Education Teacher --  Full-time teachers work on a CDI contract Contrat Duration Interminable. More information can be found here.
 
  • Short-term Contract Continuing Education Teacher -- These teachers carry out specific, temporary teaching contracts called CDDs.  More information can be found here.
 
  • Civil servant, or public school teacher - these teachers have passed the CAPES or Agregation exams which is an extremely difficult and highly competitive French exam that requires training for a year. While the continuing education branch as described above tends to attract expats, the public school certification in France tends to attract French native speakers with high levels of English. While the educational system will not turn away any foreigner hoping to take the Capes or the Agregation, the applicant should be aware that a native-like capacity of French is absolutely necessary to pass these two exams. Jennifer Yee offers her insight in A Visitor in the Land of the Enlightenment.
    The Proceedings of a past TESOL France event The Great Debate: Is the current concours system (CAPES and Agrégation) the best method for selecting and preparing future English teachers in France? are now available for download (Click here to download). In addition, Vera Dickman's informative presentation on "How are teachers trained for today's French National Education system?" is also available for download (Click here to download).
 
  • Vacataire, or university sub-employee -- This tends to be a very precarious status. You are generally well paid (between 40 and 50 euros an hour) but can be fired easily. Teachers generally take on vacataire positions to earn some extra money on the side, and there is no shortage of vacataire positions. Some can take on two or three vacataire positions while still juggling a 20-hour teaching week elsewhere. To be a vacataire, one must already have a permanent teaching position, or be a free-lance self-employed teacher with his or her own company. For more information on Vacataire Status in France, download this document, "Language Teachers: are they vacataires?" English Version and Version Française.
 
  • Self-employed auto-entrepreneur teachers.  More information about this status can be found here.
 
  • Self-employed Travailleur Independent teachers.  More information about this status can be found here.
 
  • "Under-the-Table" English Teacher While TESOL France in no way encourages teachers to work "in the black" (under the table), the truth is there is a large population of teachers in France who do this.  According to various online forums, the going rate is between 10 and 40 euro an hour.  Teachers will often do this on the side in addition to contract work.  Students can range from children to adults.  Most teachers state that it is next to impossible today to make a living doing only this in France.
 
The reality: Finding a teaching job can be easy, but working conditions may be harsh. Most teachers work for two, three, or even six different schools and can have more than one permanent contract. Salaries are as consistent as the weather in Paris. This juggling of hours is necessary to earn an appropriate living in France. Many compare it to an actor's life -- while you're on the job you're already looking for your next one. Those who do it claim they prefer this to sitting in an office day after day. In short, it takes a passionate, creative, and driven person to be an English teacher in France. But those who succeed wouldn't trade it for the world.
back
 
9. How can I find a job in France?

Meccas for job-hunters include the American Church in Paris which even offers career forums for job-seekers and the American Cathedral in Paris.  Both have notice boards crammed with employment opportunities, courses and housing listings.Most expatriate meeting places in Paris distribute the free bilingual newsletter France-USA Contacts www.fusac.org that comes out every other Wednesday. Its classified ads are best followed up on the day the paper appears. It is also a good place to put your own "Work wanted" ad. You can do this ahead of time by contacting FUSAC in the U.S. at P.O. Box 115, Coopers Station, New York, NY 10276 (212-777-5553, fax 212-777-5554).
Once you get some experience under your belt, you will often get more work through word of mouth.
 
TESOL France Jobs List
If you become a member of TESOL France, you are automatically added to the TESOL France Jobs List - a weekly emailing of job offers we recieve.  
10. Can you recommend any French job listing websites? http://www.transitionsabroad.com/listings/work/esl/teaching_english_abroad_news.shtml
http://www.goabroad.com
This third website is recommended by Top College Advisor, Katherine Cohen Ph.D. It allows you to search for many different programs by subject or location (e.g. France), as well as for jobs, internships, teaching positions, and language schools.
See also: http://www.jobsabroad.com/France.cfm  
11. I am a student in France with a student carte de sejour. I want work in France after I finish my studies. How do I renew my carte de sejour to be able to work in France?

From the http://paris.angloinfo.com online forum: "Unless you find a company who will sponsor you, you will be unable to change your titre de sejour etudiant to a salaried one. This however is extremely difficult to accomplish, because the company has to advertise the job for X number of months to show that there is not a single other person on French soil who could fulfill this post. You might have some luck trying the Business English schools, but even then, many of them prefer to hire British nationals as they don't need carte de sejours or work permits."
From another posting on http://paris.angloinfo.com "It is just about impossible to change your status from a student visa. As an employer - I can confirm that unless you are an EU citizen or married to one, or have some exceptional, unique and highly valuable skill it would be well nigh impossible for a company to offer you a job. Companies have to go through a long, costly and frustrating process in order to try to employ someone from outside the EU. Then again I would not expected to be able to work in the US/England/Mauritius/wherever because I had studied there. If you are from within the EU though - you are eligible to work in any EU country".  
12. I'm an American teacher in France. I worked as a lectrice at a university last year and have gotten the same job but at a different university. Do I need to get a new visa?

From teacher, Christine Allsopp: According to the US Embassy website, work visas are good for only 3 months. It sounds like you've had a carte de sejour over the last year. What you need to do now is to renew that. To do so you'll be required to provide lots of documents almost the same as you did the first time. You'll have to show the document from the university (attestation') to the effect you will be employed there, dates, salary, etc. The main other documents are always proof that you live where you say you do, and health insurance, which should be Securite Sociale since you work at a university.To do all that, you'll have to go to the Prefecture if you live in Paris, or to the Mairie inyour district. I remember only too well what hell it is. Allow loads of time. The Prefecture will check your document, give you a list of what's needed, and give you an appointment to go back there another time with a list of everything you need. If you have had a work permit, you will have to renew that too. You can contact the office where you did it the first time to find out what's needed. They will probably tell you to take along your "attestation" or "contrat" from the university and your carte de sejour.  
13. Is there any way around the Prefecture de Police when applying for work permits?

No.  
14. What's the average waiting time at the Prefecture de Police?

On a good day, three hours. Plan to be there before the doors open in the morning and plan to be there the entire day just in case. Bring a good book and an external phone charger...and food.  
15. Does anyone have any concrete information about independent language teaching in France?

Past president of TESOL France, Bethany Cagnol, writes a blog about being an independent teacher. A note from Bethany: Please forgive the outdated information and long time spans between posts.
back
 
16. I still have questions.

Contact TESOL France and we will do our best to answer them.
Go to Dave's ESL Cafe for France and submit your questions on the teachers' forum. This site is vast. You will probably find someone who has already asked your question about teaching in France.  
17. If you have any comments or suggestions for these FAQs.

Please let us know by contacting us here.  

TESOL FRANCE - Télécom ParisTech
46, rue Barrault - 75634 Paris Cedex 13
See map - Email us
© Copyright 2014 TESOL FRANCE, all rights reserved
CMS by BLWorks.net  |  control panel