Colloquium 2009

The 28th Annual Colloquium - A Great Event


November 6 & 7, 2009

Download the complete printed program
Quick access: Plenary Sessions  -  Workshops  -  Posters

 

Program


Plenary & Associated Worshops

Penny Ur   Plenary: English as a Lingua Franca
Associated workshop: Teaching Large Heterogeneous Classes
Jamie Keddie   Plenary: Materials World
Associated workshop: Grammar Drawings
 

Workshops

Burcu Akyol
Istek Schools, Turkey
  ELT Meets the Blogosphere
Theme: Young Learners & Learning Technologies 
Mahrukh Bharucha
Expressions Unlimited!,
India Lamda; UK
  Using Drama in an English Language Class
Theme: Classroom Techniques & Pronunciation
Jean Brewster
Freelance, UK
  The Interplay Between English-medium Subject Teaching and English Teachers
Theme: Teacher Training and Development & English for Specific Purposes
Annette Capel
Cambridge University Press, France
  Making Sense of Words: The English Profile Wordlists Project
Theme: Corpus in the Classroom & Adult Learners
Alan Cargyl
International House London
  Output Feedback: How to use what students say to help them speak 'better'
Theme: Business English & Classroom Techniques
Carla Chamberlin-Quinlisk
The Pennsylvania State University, USA
  Critical Media Education in TESOL: Bringing popular culture into the language classroom
Theme: Classroom Techniques & Intercultural Issues
Lindsay Clandfield
Delta Publishing
  Blogging Your Way to Being a Better Teacher
Theme: Learning Technologies & Teacher Training and Development
Maggie Collins and Peter John Hassall
ESSC, France and Zayed University, UAE
  World Englishes as Art: the Extremely Short Story [ESS] in Arabia and the Far East
Theme: Higher Education & Intercultural Issues
 
Anna Daley
IUFM Châteauroux, freelance translator
  How Working with Translation Can Help Us Learn about Language
Theme: Classroom Techniques & Grammar and Vocabulary
Alain Daumas
Directeur France d'ETS Global
  L'observatoire TOEIC 2009 des niveaux d'anglais en France: pour mieux connaître le niveau des français
Theme: Testing and Assessment
Hugh Dellar
Heinle ELT
  Lexis, Speaking and the Non-Native Speaker Teacher
Theme: Adult Learners & Global Issues
Robert Dignen
York Associates
  International Leadership - Competencies for Working Effectively across Cultures
Theme: Business English & Intercultural Issues
Gavin Dudeney
Pearson Longman
  Beyond the Book
Theme: Learning Technologies & Teacher Training and Development
Robert Emigh
Norwalk Community College, Connecticut, USA.
  Facilitating Awareness of Global Issues from Inside and Outside the Classroom
Theme: Higher Education & Global Issues
Parvanak "Pary" Fassihi
CELOP/Boston University
  Clickers: A New Approach to Engaging Students in the ESL / EFL Classroom
Theme: Learning Technologies & Tried and Tested Classroom Techniques
Linda Gerena
York College, City University of New York, USA
  Writing and Grammar in Culturally Explicit Rhetorical Discourse
Theme: Intercultural Issues & Grammar and Vocabulary
Charles Goodger
Bologna University, Italy
  Songs in Action
Theme: Young Learners & Classroom Techniques
Michael Hall
University College Plymouth St Mark & St John, UK
  Why Speaking English to Your Students Matters
Theme: Teacher Training and Development & The Four Skills
 
Philip Hawkes
Teaching Materials Coordinator, Edulang
  Building a Didacticized World English Resource into a Teacher-led Course
Theme: Global Issues & Four Skills
Maria Heron
NILE
  Fun with Vocab
Theme: Adult Learners & Grammar and Vocabulary
David A. Hill
Helbling Languages
  Writing Stories
Theme: Teen and Adult Learners & Global Issues
David Horner
Cambridge ESOL 
  Constructing Oral Assessment Grids from the CEFRL
Theme: Testing and Assessment & Adult Learners
Mike Howard
Pearson Language Tests, France 
  PTE Academic: setting a new standard in Academic English testing and fully endorsed by the Graduate Management Admission Council
Theme: Testing and Assessment & English for Specific Purposes
Aimee Johansen
Télécom Bretagne, Brest
  So What Do You Want to Do for a Living?" Incorporating career planning materials into English classes
Theme: Adult Learners & Intercultural Issues
Jamie Keddie
Oxford University Press
NILE
  Grammar Drawings
Theme: Classroom Techniques & Grammar and Vocabulary
 
Paul Maglione and Frederic Tibout
Entertainment Learning
  Games: The Pedagogical Revolution. From Edutainment to Games 2.0; Implications for EFL
Theme: Learning Technologies & Classroom Techniques
Arthur McKeown
University of Ulster, UK
  Free and Freemium: Resourses for Teaching Business (and other) English
Theme: Materials Design & Publishing & Business English
Cleve Miller
Cambridge - English360
  From Print to Digital: Collaborative content and the future of the coursebook
Theme: Materials Design and Publishing & Learning Technologies
Tammi Santana
TESOL-SPAIN
  Quick and Fun Activities to Practice New Vocabulary
Theme: Grammar and Vocabulary & Classroom Techniques
Fulvia Seales
British Council, Bilbao, Spain
  Generating Student Motivation
Theme: Young Learners & Research
Margit Szesztay
Department of English Language Pedagogy, ELTE University Budapest
  cREATIVITY with a Small 'c'
Theme: Adult Learners
 
Penny Ur
Oranim and Haifa University, Israel
  Teaching Large Heterogeneous Classes
Theme: Higher Education & Teacher Training and Development
Jennifer Verschoor
ARCALL Argentine Computer Assisted Language Learning, Freelance
  It's a NetWorld... Let's NetWorld: Are you ready to face the challenges of working online?
Theme: Learning Technologies & English for Specific Purposes
Mercedes Viola
IATEFL - BESIG
  Designing English Programs for Business People
Theme: Business English & Adult Learners
A speaker from Uruguay brought to you by video conference
Ken Wilson
Oxford University Press
  Turning Passive Students into Active Learners
Theme: Young Learners & Learner Styles
 

Posters


Friday Nov 6: 16:15 - 17:00
Saturday Nov 7: 14:00 - 15:00
 
Michael Carroll
Momoyama Gakuin University, Japan
  The Study-abroad Wiki: Integrating overseas study into the overall language curriculum
Theme: Higher Education & Learning Technologies.
Yuh-Fang Chang
National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan
  Investigating the Emergence Order of Apology Strategies
Theme: Intercultural issues and Adult Learners
Sylvie Dolakova
Freelance
  Storytelling? Young Learners? Limited Vocabulary? Why Not?
Theme: Young Learners & Teacher Training and Development.
Parvanak "Pary" Fassihi
CELOP/Boston University
  Clickers: A New Approach to Engaging Students in the ESL / EFL Classroom
Theme: Learning Technologies & Tried and Tested Classroom Techniques.
Igor Gavilán
Eibar Idiomas Hizkuntzak, Spain
  IF IF IF... To IF or not to IF, that is the question
Theme: Classroom Techniques & Grammar and Vocabulary
 
Maidy Giber
University of South Australia
  Teachers' Language Learning Experiences
Theme: Intercultural Issues & Teacher Training and Development
Susana Gómez & Anisoara Pop,
TESOL Spain, and Dimitrie Cantemir University of Targu Mures, Romania
  Using Audacity to Optimize Your Listening Sessions
Theme: Learning Technologies.
 
Beverly J. Hearn
University of Tennessee at Martin
  Increasing Your Students' Reading Speed
Theme: Tried and Tested Classroom Techniques & Language Testing
 
Monika Lodej
IATEFL Poland
  Teaching Reading to ESL Dyslexic Students
Theme: Learner Styles
Mojtaba Mohammadi
Islamic Azad University, Roudehen Branch, Iran
  The Pathology of Demotivation and Amotivation in Language Learning Context: A Case Study
Theme: Adult Learners & Learner styles
Zhivka Ilieva
Shumen University, Dobrich College, Bulgaria
  Interdisciplinary Relations in the Primary Classroom
Theme: Young Learners & Adult Learners
 
Tuuli Oder
Tallinn University Language Centre, Estonia
  Language Exams Based on CEFR at Tallinn University: A two-year experience
Theme: Language Testing & Higher Education
Carme Porcel
Freelance, Spain
  Watching Films Is More Than Fun
Theme: Adult Learners & Young Learners
Marianne Raynaud
TESOL France - Grenoble Coordinator
  Student Presentations: Making them beneficial and worthwhile for everyone!
Theme: Higher Education & Teacher Training and Development
Semra Sadik & Fatma Sadik, Cukurova University, Turkey   Bringing Motivation Back to the Classroom
Theme: Adult Learners & Teacher Training and Development.
Kayo Shirasaka
Miyazaki Prefectural Nursing University, Japan
  Focusing on Vocabulary and Grammar Learning in a Writing Exchange Project
Theme: Adult Learners
 
 

Plenary Sessions


Plenary and Associated Workshop by Penny Ur


Plenary: English as a Lingua Franca
by Penny Ur
 
It is estimated that there are now in the world over two billion English-speakers of whom the majority speak it as a second or foreign language. Indeed, English is now used more as a lingua franca for various functions of international communication (business, research, diplomacy etc.) than it is used intra-nationally for communication with each other by its native speakers. And most educated people in the world today (at least outside the English-speaking countries) are 'English-knowing bilinguals': they speak their own language(s) for home use, and English for international communication.

There are various interesting implications of this development for English teachers which will be discussed this talk. I shall address questions such as: Is there such a thing as an ELF standard of language use in grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation? How does the development of ELF change our teaching goals? Does it make any difference to the function and prestige of the 'native' or 'non-native' English speaking teacher? What is the place of the culture of the English-speaking peoples in the teaching of ELF?

Presentation  -  Handouts

 
Workshop: Teaching Large Heterogeneous Classes
by Penny Ur

What is a large class? What is a heterogeneous class? What are the problems we encounter when we have to teach classes that are both large and heterogeneous?

In this talk I will begin by attempting to define what is meant by 'large' and 'heterogeneous', and then go on to list some of the main problems -but also the advantages!- that we encounter when trying to teach them. As with many educational problems, there are no easy solutions. We could, perhaps largely solve them by preparing different tasks to suit different groups within the class; or by preparing several texts at varying levels of difficulty, as suggested by some methodologists. But most of us have neither the time nor the money to invest in such elaborate preparation, let alone the time to check the results later.

In this talk, I shall be proposing and discussing a series of practical teaching principles, illustrated by practical procedures, that involve very little (or no) extra preparation, that can make our job teaching large heterogeneous classes easier, and that go some way towards bringing about more effective learning.

Presentation  -  Handouts  -  Video

 
Penny Ur's Bio
 
Penny Ur was educated at the universities of Oxford (MA), Cambridge (PGCE) and Reading (MATEFL). She emigrated to Israel in 1967, where she still lives today. She is married with four children and five grandchildren. Penny Ur has thirty years' experience as an English teacher in primary and secondary schools in Israel. She has recently retired from the headship of the M.Ed program in foreign-language teaching at Oranim Academic College of Education, but continues to teach M.A. courses at Oranim and Haifa University. She is interested in all aspects of language-teaching methodology, but in particular issues of fluency and accuracy in language teaching, language-learning activity design and the implications for teachers of the development of English as a lingua franca. She has published a number of articles, and was for ten years the editor of the Cambridge Handbooks for Language Teachers series. Her books include Discussions that Work (1981), Five Minute Activities (co-authored with Andrew Wright) (1992), A Course in Language Teaching (1996), and Grammar Practice Activities (2nd Edition) (2009), all published by Cambridge University Press.


Plenary and Associated Workshop by Jamie Keddie

 
Plenary: Materials World
by Jamie Keddie (Oxford University Press / NILE)
 
In an ELT context, what does the word materials mean to you? In this highly practical talk, I will be examining the richness of resources that are available to the modern language teacher. By dissecting six of my favourite lesson plans, I would like to share some thoughts on some essential lesson-planning skills which are often overlooked.

 
Workshop: Grammar Drawings
by Jamie Keddie

When a learner draws a piece of language, that language is suddenly brought to life and made memorable. In this workshop, which will be useful for teachers of all levels and ages, we will see some original grammar-based activities which exploit a fantastic piece of classroom technology - the pencil.

Presentation  -  Video

 
Jamie Keddie's Bio

Jamie Keddie is a European-based teacher, teacher trainer and writer. In 2008, he founded TEFLclips.com, a site dedicated to the possibilities for online video-sharing in the classroom. For this, he received a British Council Innovations award in 2009. He is the author of Images in the Resource Books for Teachers series published by Oxford University Press. He is also a teacher trainer at Norwich Institute for Language Education.

 

Workshops

 

ELT Meets the Blogosphere

by Burcu Akyol (Istek Schools, Turkey)

Theme: Young Learners & Learning Technologies
Friday, November 6th (17:00 - 18:00)

Video

This presentation explores the limitless potential of blogs in the language classroom in a highly visual way and gives some practical ideas on setting up a blog for use with your own classes in the light of a successful experience creating and maintaining a blog throughout an academic year with ninety-three 5th grade students in a private school in Turkey.

Burcu Akyol graduated from Hacettepe University, ELT Department in 2000. She holds a Master's degree in Educational Management. Her main areas of interest are teacher training and learning technologies. Currently, she works at Istek Schools as Foreign Languages Department, Education Coordinator.

Using Drama in an English Language Class

by Mahrukh Bharucha (Expressions Unlimited!, India Lamda; UK)

Theme: Classroom Techniques & Pronunciation
Friday, November 6th (14:00 - 15:00)

France and India have a common problem: the native tongue influence hampers ELT. Drama is a great tool to overcome the issue. Drama techniques dispel inhibitions, encourage conversations and allow freer practice of accurate intonation, pronunciation and diction. Most ELT teachers are wary of this approach, however, due to lack of knowledge, or experience or both! This presentation aims to introduce both experienced and fresh teachers to the wonder and magic of using drama - and its techniques - in the Language classroom. The theory is tried and tested - and this presentation will prove it!

I run a very successful Speech & Drama Academy and Language centre - EXPRESSIONS UNLIMITED! -catering to non-native speakers (young learners and adults). Using drama as a tool for ELT is my forte. I also conduct extensive teacher training. Qualifications: B.A. (English) CELTA Certified Speech, Drama & Communication Skills Teacher.

The Interplay Between English-medium Subject Teaching and English Teachers

by Jean Brewster (Freelance, UK)
Theme: Teacher Training and Development & English for Specific Purposes
Saturday, November 7th (17:30 - 18:30)

This talk adds to the debate on the impact of CLIL on ELT. The speaker will outline a recent training programme she co-authored and taught for primary school teachers of maths and science in Qatar, highlighting some of the major skills teachers and students require. These include language skills and thinking skills closely linked to a range of process skills. She will also highlight some issues in the impact of CLIL on the role of the English teacher, such as the kind of curriculum and syllabus that could be developed.

Dr Brewster has trained teachers in CLIL for thirty years, most recently as team leader for a primary teacher- training project in Qatar for English-medium maths and science. With an M.Phil and PhD in content-based learning she has published several CLIL articles.

Making Sense of Words: The English Profile Wordlists Project

by Annette Capel (Cambridge University Press, France)

Theme: Corpus in the Classroom & Adult Learners
Saturday, November 7th (9:30 - 10:30)

English Profile is a collaborative project developing language descriptors for the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). As part of this project, Cambridge University Press has sponsored research into A1-B2 vocabulary: the English Profile Wordlists provide reliable information at word and sense level, based on extensive corpus analysis and other relevant sources. The speaker will explain the research and compiling methods used and consider areas such as affixation, phrases and collocation, and polysemous words. What does it actually mean to "know a word"? Vocabulary acquisition is a cumulative process and reliable information on frequency and usefulness helps to establish priorities for teachers and students.

Annette Capel has been involved in the Cambridge exams as an item writer and examiner since 1990, and is co-author of textbooks for five levels of these exams (A2 to C2). Since 2007, Annette has been developing corpus-informed Wordlists for A1 to B2, as part of the English Profile project.

Output Feedback: How to use what students say to help them speak 'better'

by Alan Cargyl (International House London)

Theme: Business English & Classroom Techniques
Saturday, November 7th (17:30 - 18:30)

This interactive, task based and practical workshop will demonstrate how to use the language produced by students to develop their English, show language development and reduce the use of commercial material in class. Suitable for students pre-intermediate and above. Used at the Executive Centre, International House London with adult professionals but also suitable for General English students. The session will demonstrate the technique and give participants the opportunity to practise it.

Alan Cargyl is the Assistant Director of the Executive Centre at IH London. He has worked there as a language trainer for 11 years and has delivered sessions at numerous international language conferences.

Critical Media Education in TESOL: Bringing popular culture into the language classroom

by Carla Chamberlin-Quinlisk (The Pennsylvania State University, USA)

Theme: Classroom Techniques & Intercultural Issues
Saturday, November 7th (17:30 - 18:30)

Language students and teachers today have unprecedented access to global media, and many turn to these as sources of authentic discourse. Although captivating as linguistic resources, media also embed multiple layers of meaning (social, political, gendered, etc.) in their imagery and rhetoric that merit discussion in our classrooms. Using newspapers, magazine advertisements, and film as examples, this presentation shows how critical media analysis and cultural studies approaches can be successfully merged as a pedagogical tool for addressing both linguistic and sociocultural issues in language classrooms. Activities for various ESL/EFL contexts and proficiency levels will be shared and discussed.

Carla Chamberlin-Quinlisk is Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics and Communication at Penn State University. She has taught ESL/EFL and applied linguistics in France, South Korea, and the U.S. for over 20 years. Her research and teaching focus on the intersections among language, culture, communication and media.

Blogging Your Way to Being a Better Teacher

by Lindsay Clandfield (Delta Publishing)

Theme: Learning Technologies & Teacher Training and Development
Saturday, November 7th (10:45 - 11:45)

Video

Teachers are beginning to use blogs more and more to help their students. But how can this new medium help teachers to help themselves? In this talk I will take you on a tour of some of the top blogs by teachers for teachers and explore how these can aid in our development. We will look at what makes a good blog, how to get the most out of the blogosphere and some useful advice for those of you wishing to start your own blog for teachers.

Lindsay Clandfield is an award-winning author of books for teachers and learners. He is the series editor for the new Delta Teacher Development Series and the blogger behind the popular site www.sixthings.net.

World Englishes as Art: the Extremely Short Story [ESS] in Arabia and the Far East

by Maggie Collins and Peter John Hassall (On-line Editor and Representative for the Extremely Short Story Competition [ESSC], France and Originator/Principal Editor ESSC, Academic Bridge Program, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates)

Theme: Higher Education & Intercultural Issues
Friday, November 6th (15:15 - 16:15)

Presentation  -  Handouts

The title of this talk proposes that Englishes of diverse regions of the World, authored by local users of the language, may provide the foundation for a new art form conveying ideas and images of significance to both native and non-native users. Illustrative examples will be presented taken from three commercially available anthologies, websites and an international touring exhibition, all based on the Extremely Short Story Competition [ESSC], originating at Zayed University Dubai which has spread throughout the Arabian Peninsula and Far East. A PowerPoint will explain how the ESSC is having an impact on EFL/ESL learners and the wider milieu in these regions.

Maggie is an on-line Editor/Representative for the Extremely Short Story Competition [ESSC] now living in France. She has lectured extensively in EAP/ESP in Singapore and in recent years used the ESSC as a valuable part of the writing course at Dubai Men's College (DMC), Higher Colleges of Technology, UAE. Peter Hassall, of the Academic Bridge Program Zayed University Dubai, is originator of the Extremely Short Story Competition [ESSC] and Principal Editor of 3 ESSC anthologies: Emiratia; Pearls of Emirati Wisdom; Facets of Emirati Women. He judges the ESSC Japan and regularly contributes to Asian Englishes and World Englishes.

How Working with Translation Can Help Us Learn about Language

by Anna Daley (IUFM Châteauroux, freelance translator)

Theme: Classroom Techniques & Grammar and Vocabulary
Saturday, November 7th (15:00 - 16:00)

Translation is sometimes seen as rather old hat but it can bring insight into how language works, even for lower level students. As someone who combines the careers of teacher and translator, I have used translation in different ways with different groups of learners, and have learnt many things from it myself which have been useful in my teaching. I would like to share some of my expereinces in this area with you.

Anna Daley is a teacher, teacher trainer, and translator. She has been living and working in central France for the past 16 years. She is interested in all aspects of teaching and learning English, and particularly in bilingual education.

L'observatoire TOEIC 2009 des niveaux d'anglais en France : pour mieux connaître le niveau des français

by Alain Daumas (Directeur France d'ETS Global)

Theme: Testing and Assessment
Friday, November 6th (14:00 - 15:00)

Presentation

ETS Global vient de lancer la première édition de "l'Observatoire TOEIC des niveaux d'anglais en France". Cet observatoire a pour objectif de dresser un état des lieux complet des niveaux en anglais professionnel des candidats français tout au long de leur vie :
  • Lycée
  • Bac+2
  • Bac+3
  • Bac+5
  • Doctorat
  • Salariés

Les résultats 2009 de cet observatoire seront exposés lors de cette conférence. Les participants pourront poser toutes leurs questions et échanger sur ce premier bilan afin de mieux comprendre et de mieux interpréter les informations présentées.

Dix années d'expérience internationale dans la mise en place de dispositifs de recrutement, formation et évaluation en milieu académique et professionnel. Diplômé de l'Ecole de Management de Lyon en 1995, Monsieur Daumas a fait ses classes dans les métiers de la vente, du marketing et de la formation interne chez Procter & Gamble de 1996 à 2000. Il prend ensuite la direction commerciale européenne du Groupe Auralog, spécialiste des formations linguistiques en E-learning. Depuis 2006 il est Directeur France d'ETS Global, filiale internationale d'Educational Testing Service, créateur des certifications TOEIC & TOEFL.

Lexis, Speaking and the Non-Native Speaker Teacher

by Hugh Dellar (Heinle ELT)

Theme: Adult Learners & Global Issues
Saturday, November 7th (10:45 - 11:45)

Presentation  -  Handouts

That language is highly formulaic seems widely accepted. However, there's been much debate as to the relevance of this for non-native speaker teachers (NNSTs) teachers of English. It's been claimed that lexis is more culturally-rooted than grammar and that a lexical approach will leave NNSTs in danger of being caught out by students. However, NNSTs have the upper-hand when it comes to teaching lexically. I will outline why whilst also addressing the flexible cultural positions language can be utilised in, the lunacy of demonising translation and the wonders of local knowledge - all with reference to classroom realities!

Hugh Dellar is a teacher and teacher trainer at the University of Westminster. He is also the co-author of the Innovations series of coursebooks, as well as the forthcoming OUTCOMES series, published by Heinle Cengage.

International Leadership - Competencies for Working Effectively across Cultures

by Robert Dignen (York Associates)

Theme: Business English & Intercultural Issues
Saturday, November 7th (15:00 - 16:00)

This presentation is based on the proposition that the ELT industry's focus on language and identified professional communication skills needs to shift. Those in business need support beyond the traditional mix of English language, training for specific "moments" (presentations, meetings, negotiations) and cultural knowledge in the form of country culture briefings. This presentation outlines a new approach for ELT with an introduction to an alternative syllabus of core international leadership challenges and associated communication skills tied to a model of intercultural competence.

Bob Dignen is a director of York Associates. He specialises in delivering international team seminars. His titles include 50 Ways to improve your international presentation skills and 50 Ways to improve your intercultural skills published by Summertown. He is co-author of Developing People Internationally, a multimedia international team training resource.

Beyond the Book

by Gavin Dudeney (Pearson Longman)

Theme: Learning Technologies & Teacher Training and Development
Saturday, November 7th (15:00 - 16:00)

Presentation  -  Handouts  -  Video

This is a talk about new digital literacies, about the differences between 'digital illiterates' (mostly teachers!) and learners under the age of about 20 who are fluent in 'digital as a second language'. It's fairly light (or can be) in terms of theory, but looks at practical examples of new literacies, why they're important and where teachers can start acquiring the skills they need. Really it's an up-to-date look at where the gap lies between teachers and learners in terms of their ability to use technologies.

Gavin has worked in education since 1988, as a teacher, materials developer, IT manager and web/user interface designer. His blend of pedagogical and technical skills has taken him around the world - primarily for the International House World Organisation, but also for the British Council and other entities - helping them to bridge the gap between their training and teaching portfolio and their technical needs. Gavin has published How to Teach English with Technology (Longman, 2007) with Nicky Hockly. He is also the author of other books and numerous print and online articles.

Facilitating Awareness of Global Issues from Inside and Outside the Classroom

by Robert Emigh (Norwalk Community College, Connecticut, USA.)

Theme: Higher Education & Global Issues
Friday, November 6th (14:00 - 15:00)

Presentation

Today, due to both a growing interconnectedness of the world and a myriad of economic, environmental and human rights challenges that currently present themselves to us, facilitating student awareness of these pressing global issues is a task that many educators are feeling more compelled to engage in. This presentation will look at strategies and resources that will not only help to increase our students' awareness of these issues, but help to empower them and give them a sense of agency over their futures.

Robert Emigh received a Master's in Teaching (ESOL) from the School for International Training in Brattleboro, Vermont. He has taught in Thailand, Brazil and New York City. He is currently an Associate Professor of ESL at Norwalk Community College in Norwalk, Connecticut, USA.

Clickers: A New Approach to Engaging Students in the ESL / EFL Classroom

by Parvanak "Pary" Fassihi (CELOP/Boston University)

Theme: Learning Technologies & Tried and Tested Classroom Techniques.
Friday, November 6th (14:00 - 15:00)

Student Response Systems, or clickers, when used with interactive pedagogies, are known to increase student interaction and consequently, student achievement in content domains such as math and physics. Clickers have both a hardware and software component that collects and displays student responses. Students use a small device, similar to a television remote control, to respond to multiple-choice questions. The overall results become instantaneously available to the audience in form of a pie chart or bar graph. The presenter will demonstrate the hardware and software component of the clickers and talk about its advantages in ESL / EFL classes.

This speaker also presents a poster.

Pary Fassihi is an ESL Senior Lecturer at the Center for Language and Orientation Programs (CELOP) at Boston University. She has 13 years of experience teaching ESL / EFL. Her specialization is the use of technology in ESL / EFL classes. She is currently pursuing her doctoral degree in Language Education at Boston University.

Writing and Grammar in Culturally Explicit Rhetorical Discourse

by Linda Gerena (York College, City University of New York, USA)

Theme: Intercultural Issues & Grammar and Vocabulary
Saturday, November 7th (9:30 - 10:30)

Presentation 

This presentation will outline areas of grammatical difficulty faced by English learners, the cultural context of writing and how culture impacts rhetorical preferences. Teaching grammar to English learners is a necessary part of the language curriculum for teachers. The question is, however, how do we teach grammar? Should it be explicit, bottom up, discrete skill instruction or should it be top down, communicative and interactional? How does culture impact rhetorical preferences and how can these preferences be included in instructional pedagogy? Strategies for teaching academic English written discourse from both a grammatical and a cultural perspective will be discussed.

Linda Gerena received her Ph.D. in Educational Policy/Bilingual Education from San Diego State University and is an Associate Professor in Teacher Education at City University of New York, York College. Professional interests in over 20 years in TESOL include language acquisition, cultural preferences in writing, and at-risk secondary English learners.

Songs in Action

by Charles Goodger (Bologna University, Italy)

Theme: Young Learners & Classroom Techniques
Saturday, November 7th (9:30 - 10:30) - en francais

Presentation  -  Video  -  Twitter

Through a series of practical examples Charles Goodger will demonstrate his on-line FunSongs Approach (officially recommended by the Italian, Latvian and Lithuanian Ministries of Education) in which melody, mime, rhythm and rhyme can accelerate memorisation, encourage correct pronunciation and enhance the language learning process for young learners. He will present and teach a series of original language-learning action songs on several specific themes and show how their content can be recycled and integrated into a curriculum. Fluent in five languages, Goodger will present this workshop in French.

Teacher-trainer, course book writer and musician Charles Goodger writes language-learning action songs for FunSongs Ltd. His influences are Howard Gardner, Georgi Lozanov and James J. Asher (Total Physical Response). Charles Goodger is currently on leave from Bologna University where he has unlimited tenure as a language expert.

What Exactly is Grammar, and does it matter?

by Michael Hall (University College Plymouth St Mark & St John, UK)

Theme: Teacher Training and Development & The Four Skills
Friday, November 6th (17:00 - 18:00)

Presentation

Whilst audiovisual resources for the English language classroom are multiplying exponentially (think YouTube), the most readily available and undervalued resource of all is you, the teacher. Your students may spend more time listening to you than to any other English speaker on the planet. So how do you use English in the classroom, and how can they learn from you? In this paper I propose to explore the different ways in which teachers speak to their students, analyse some authentic samples of teacher talk with you, and suggest how your spoken English can help your students' comprehension.

Michael Hall joined Marjon in 1996 after a long peripatetic career in ELT. He currently works as a teacher and trainer with participants from many countries. His professional interests include intercultural awareness, online teaching and learning, learner autonomy and the future of English.

Building a Didacticized World English Resource into a Teacher-led Course

by Philip Hawkes (Teaching Materials Coordinator, Edulang)

Theme: Global Issues & Four Skills
Saturday, November 7th (16:15 - 17:15)

Video

Users of English increasingly need the skill of understanding speakers of wide varieties of international English - including both first and foreign language speakers. Teachers need properly didacticized resources for this purpose. This talk will present a vast online bank of lessons which teachers can easily build into their blended courses. English Addicts, updated every day, are online lessons based on authentic 2 to 4 minute radio reports from all over the world, on all sorts of topics and at several levels of difficulty. We will discuss the ways in which teachers can use them - as a teacher told us: "Recently English Addicts has become a major part of our arsenal - we like it and so do the students."

Philip Hawkes is a teacher, materials writer and translator. He has been living and working in Brittany for 20 years and runs a company called Flexilangues. He is interested in practical ways of integrating IT into lively English teaching.

Fun with Vocab

by Maria Heron (NILE)

Theme: Adult Learners & Grammar and Vocabulary
Saturday, November 7th (15:00 - 16:00)

This hands-on workshop visits some innovative nuts and basic bolts of working with vocabulary generated in class, which is often recorded by students as long lists of words often never to be seen again! We will start by looking at how learners of all ages and levels can personalise and record new lexis using a low tech, high performance 'vocabulary box' and we will try out activities which focus on individual word practice and revision by elicitation. We will then demonstrate how individual words can become core catalysts for creative writing activities - to include poetry and stories.

Maria Heron is a practicing teacher and teacher trainer with 25 years experience. Her work has been mainly in the UK but she has also worked in Germany, Switzerland, Canada, Argentina and Panama. She is CELTA Centre Manager at NILE. Her areas of interest are IELTS and vocabulary acquisition.

Writing Stories

by David A. Hill (Helbling Languages)

Theme: Teen and Adult Learners & Global Issues
Saturday, November 7th (16:15 - 17:15)

Human beings live through stories, and we ignore this in the classroom at our peril. Inroads have been made into the world of story in ELT, mostly through extensive reading and story-telling, but so far there has been no systematic approach to writing stories. This workshop will give participants the opportunity to work through some ideas which help learners to build up their story-writing abilities, whilst practising many other skills. The activities presented are also intrinsically interesting, and can work as stand-alones.

David A. Hill is a free-lance teacher trainer and materials writer working out of Budapest. He works with teachers in around 10 countries every year, and has trained at NILE, Norwich every summer since 1998. He is the Coordinator of the IATEFL Literature, Media and Cultural Studies Special Interest Group (LMCS SIG). He plays blues and writes poetry.

Constructing Oral Assessment Grids from the CEFRL

by David Horner (Cambridge ESOL)

Theme: Testing and Assessment & Adult Learners
Saturday, November 7th (16:15 - 17:15)

Presentation

As teachers, we all have to assess our learners' oral ability. However, this is more usually done based on our own experience of levels than on valid criteria. This talk will look at how the complex and verbose descriptors of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages can be reduced to usable assessment grids using guidelines of best practice: ie, that they should be precise, clear, transparent, independent, concise, and formulated positively.

Twice president of TESOL France, former Director of the University of London in Paris, responsible for cambridge oral exams in France, David has taken part in oral testing research with cambridge and given workshops on oral testing for the MEN and is currently writing a book on oral assessment.

PTE Academic: setting a new standard in Academic English testing and fully endorsed by the Graduate Management Admission Council

by Mike Howard (Pearson Language Tests, France)

Theme: Testing and Assessment & English for Specific Purposes
Friday, November 6th (15:15 - 16:15)

Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic) is a new computer based test that sets a new standard in academic English testing. Key features include all authentic academic content, higher security, more objective scoring, more detailed performance data and much faster results (within five days) The test is being launched internationally from 26 October 2009 and will be available in France from December 14th. It has already been recognised by over 800 programmes world wide, including INSEAD and HEC in France.

Mike Howard came to France in 1992 as a musician touring in a band. After meeting his future wife (and waving goodbye to the camper van!) he decided on a career in ELT. He is currently responsible for managing PLT in France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy and Portugal.

So What Do You Want to Do for a Living?" Incorporating career planning materials into English classes

by Aimee Johansen (Télécom Bretagne, Brest)

Theme: Adult Learners & Intercultural Issues
Saturday, November 7th (10:45 - 11:45)

Presentation

As English instructors, we are in the privileged position of helping students improve their skills in English, while also exploring other areas of knowledge that they can apply to their personal or professional lives. My presentation will focus on how to incorporate career planning materials into English classes, allowing students to think about their own professional goals, as well as learning about differences between career planning in France and English-speaking countries. The use of such materials in development of the four skills will also be discussed, drawing on my experiences with engineering students in a grande école.

Aimee Johansen is an assistant professor of English at Télécom Bretagne, an engineering grande école. Having completed her Ph.D. in linguistics at the University of Illinois with a focus on the morphosyntax of Bantu languages, she is currently moving toward researching issues of didactics and second language acquisition.
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Grammar Drawings

by Jamie Keddie (Oxford University Press)

Theme: Classroom Techniques & Grammar and Vocabulary
Saturday, November 7th (10:45 - 11:45)

Presentation  -  Video

When a learner draws a piece of language, that language is suddenly brought to life and made memorable. In this workshop, which will be useful for teachers of all levels and ages, we will see some original grammar-based activities which exploit a fantastic piece of classroom technology - the pencil.

Jamie Keddie is a teacher, teacher trainer and writer who has taught in Spain and Germany. In 2008 he set up TEFLclips.com, a site dedicated to the possibilities for YouTube and other video-sharing sites in the classroom. He has written many articles on a number of subjects including grammar, image and the use of corpora in language learning. He is the author of Images in the Resource Books for Teachers series published by Oxford university Press. Jamie blogs at www.jamiekeddie.com.
 

Games: The Pedagogical Revolution. From Edutainment to Games 2.0; Implications for EFL

by Paul Maglione and Frederic Tibout (Entertainment Learning)

Theme: Learning Technologies & Classroom Techniques
Friday, November 6th (15:15 - 16:15)

Presentation

Videogames have evolved into one of the world's largest and fastest-growing entertainment industries today. Educators have long been intrigued by the possibilities of "edutainment," but it is only recently that the underlying principles of game-playing have been sufficiently understood; and game-coding tools sufficiently democratized, to enable those principles to be applied to pedagogical aims. A new wave of Learning Games, ranging from casual Flash games to virtual worlds like Second Life, promises to transform education in a way similar to how the web has revolutionized the worlds of entertainment and media. Language-learning innovators are at the forefront of this revolution, a trend with particular significance to the TESOL community.

Paul Maglione and Frederic Tibout are entertainment industry veterans, having worked across television, videogames, news media and mobile entertainment in companies as diverse as Apple, Vivendi, NBC, and CNN. Operating at the nexus of technology, business development and innovation, they are now bringing their skills to the global EFL market with their entertainment-driven English language training web service, English Attack!
 

Free and Freemium: Resourses for Teaching Business (and other) English

by Arthur McKeown (University of Ulster, UK)

Theme: Materials Design & Publishing & Business English
Saturday, November 7th (9:30 - 10:30)

Handouts

This presentation will help those attending to identify and consider options for using a range of free online resources, particularly but not only for teaching the language of business and management. Based on the Freemium approach and recognising a variety of learning styles and preferences, it looks at some quality assured print, audio and video resources available from publishers and broadcasters, from colleges and universities, etc. Some options for using these are described and discussed, so that those attending can use a simple but robust process to find and use such resources to suit their particular needs.

Arthur works in the Ulster Business School on programmes for private, public and not for profit client organisations. He has been a teacher, teacher trainer and manager in EFL. He worked in Sweden, Libya and Kuwait as well as in the UK.
 

From Print to Digital: Collaborative content and the future of the coursebook

by Cleve Miller (Cambridge - English360)

Theme: Materials Design and Publishing & Learning Technologies
Saturday, November 7th (17:30 - 18:30)

Every day thousands of teachers are mixing and matching content from published ELT materials, then creating their own lessons, tasks and exercises, all to fit the specific needs of their business English students. Today, new web technologies provide digital tools for this process of developing materials and designing courses, either for online delivery or for the classroom. This talk will first discuss these new approaches to designing and delivering training, and how this "playlist"" course design can result in highly personalized, performance-focused learning for our business English students. Second, we will look at the English360 web platform, which we created to provide free tools for collaborative content development, self-publishing, and blended course delivery for teachers and schools worldwide.

Cleve Miller has over 20 years experience designing, managing and teaching business English programs in both Europe and the Americas. Currently he leads the English360 research project, in partnership with Cambridge University Press.

Quick and Fun Activities to Practice New Vocabulary

by Tammi Santana (TESOL-SPAIN)

Theme: Grammar and Vocabulary & Classroom Techniques
Friday, November 6th (18:15 - 19:15)

Handouts

Get ready for 8 to 10 activities to use in class on Monday! You will receive a handout with a full explanation of each activity and with accompaning notes on vocabulary acquisition and memory theory. For those who teach in the Public System and have 20+ students, these techniques work well. No laborious note-taking in this session, just play. Doing is remembering.

Tammi Santana has been teaching in Spain for over 24 years. She is on the Board of Directors of TESOL-SPAIN. She has given workshops in the past and has been director of studies in two different schools, but what she loves most is teaching!

Generating Student Motivation

by Fulvia Seales (British Council, Bilbao, Spain)

Theme: Young Learners & Research
Friday, November 6th (15:15 - 16:15)

Presentation

Dornyei wrote, "Teachers' skills in motivating learners should be seen as central to teaching effectiveness" This workshop is aimed at Primary teachers interested in maintaining and increasing learners' motivation and self-confidence. We will take a look at a series of practical classroom activities and strategies, such as role-playing, games, story telling and other approaches to boost learner's confidence and lower classroom anxieties.

Fulvia Seales currently teaches primary and young learners at the British Council, Bilbao. Her areas of interest include motivation and methodology.

cREATIVITY with a Small 'c'

by Margit Szesztay (Department of English Language Pedagogy, ELTE University Budapest)

Theme: Adult Learners
Saturday, November 7th (10:45 - 11:45)

This workshop will focus on bringing creativity into your everyday teaching, and making each class a unique experience for your learners. We will explore ways of using pictures, poetry, quotations, metaphors and stories in order to develop language skills while at the same time tapping into everyone's creative potential. In particular suitable for teachers in secondary school contexts or those working with young adults in higher education or language schools.

Margit Szesztay has been an EFL teacher and teacher trainer for over twenty years. Her special areas of interest are group facilitation, community building and bringing creativity into the English language classroom. She has run and coordinated many courses and seminars for teachers in Hungary and abroad.
 

Teaching Large Heterogeneous Classes

by Penny Ur (Oranim and Haifa University, Israel)

Theme: Higher Education & Teacher Training and Development
Friday, November 6th (17:00 - 18:00)

Presentation  -  Handouts  -  Video

What is a large class? What is a heterogeneous class? What are the problems we encounter when we have to teach classes that are both large and heterogeneous?

In this talk I will begin by attempting to define what is meant by 'large' and 'heterogeneous', and then go on to list some of the main problems -but also the advantages!- that we encounter when trying to teach them. As with many educational problems, there are no easy solutions. We could, perhaps largely solve them by preparing different tasks to suit different groups within the class; or by preparing several texts at varying levels of difficulty, as suggested by some methodologists. But most of us have neither the time nor the money to invest in such elaborate preparation, let alone the time to check the results later.

In this talk, I shall be proposing and discussing a series of practical teaching principles, illustrated by practical procedures, that involve very little (or no) extra preparation, that can make our job teaching large heterogeneous classes easier, and that go some way towards bringing about more effective learning.

Penny Ur was educated at the universities of Oxford (MA), Cambridge (PGCE) and Reading (MATEFL). She emigrated to Israel in 1967, where she still lives today. She is married with four children and five grandchildren. Penny Ur has thirty years' experience as an English teacher in primary and secondary schools in Israel. She has recently retired from the headship of the M.Ed program in foreign-language teaching at Oranim Academic College of Education, but continues to teach M.A. courses at Oranim and Haifa University. She is interested in all aspects of language-teaching methodology, but in particular issues of fluency and accuracy in language teaching, language-learning activity design and the implications for teachers of the development of English as a lingua franca. She has published a number of articles, and was for ten years the editor of the Cambridge Handbooks for Language Teachers series. Her books include Discussions that Work (1981), Five Minute Activities (co-authored with Andrew Wright) (1992), A Course in Language Teaching (1996), and Grammar Practice Activities (2nd Edition) (2009), all published by Cambridge University Press.

It's a NetWorld... Let's NetWorld: Are you ready to face the challenges of working online?

by Jennifer Verschoor (ARCALL Argentine Computer Assisted Language Learning, Freelance)

Theme: Learning Technologies & English for Specific Purposes
Saturday, November 7th (16:15 - 17:15)

Due to the swine flu in Argentina teachers were forced to go online. Are you ready to face the challenges to work online? What are the ingredients for blended learning?
Throughout my presentation I will bring you up to date with how technology can be used in our teaching scenarios and how teachers can start using different online tools in their daily classroom as natural as a book.

Jennifer Verschoor holds degrees as English University Professor, Bachelor in Educational Management, English Public Translator and ICT in the Classroom validated by Trinity College London. Her emphasis in training teachers to integrate technology into the classroom started several years ago. Since then has given numerous workshops on the integration of New Technologies in Education in Argentina, Japan and Germany. Currently she is introducing New Technologies for the Teaching of English in various Leading Commercial and Educational Organizations. She is proud WEBHEAD and President of ARCALL Argentine Computer Assisted Language Learning.
 

Designing English Programs for Business People

by Mercedes Viola (IATEFL - BESIG)

Theme: Business English & Adult Learners
Saturday, November 7th (15:00 - 16:00)
A speaker from Uruguay brought to you by video conference

Presentation (1/2)  -  Presentation (2/2)

Most business English students are non-native speakers, who need to develop a range of communicative language competences in order to be able to perform their job-related tasks properly. Therefore the attention becomes more focused on language as a tool for communication rather than on language knowledge as an end in itself. When you are aware of the significance of this training for your clients, you try to provide them with tools that could help them in their careers worldwide. In this talk I will be presenting how we can develop programs that cater to our clients' needs.

Mercedes Viola holds a degree from the Universidad Republica Oriental del Uruguay. She's been a business English trainer for 20 years. She's been designing and implementing business English programs for government-owned organizations, universities and many well known global companies such as Microsoft, HP, American Express, Deloitte, John Deere and MasterCard.
 

Turning Passive Students into Active Learners

by Ken Wilson (Oxford University Press)

Theme: Young Learners & Learner Styles
Saturday, November 7th (16:15 - 17:15)

Presentation  -  Handouts  -  Video

Do you ever feel that your lesson has "gone a bit quiet"? It isn't unusual - learning often requires teachers to talk and students to listen or read. Some passive learning is OK - a percentage of your students probably prefer studying this way. However, when things "go a bit quiet", maybe the lesson is TOO passive, and most students don't benefit from that. This talk will present ideas about turning passive lessons into active ones. We will look at ways of getting students more involved with reading texts, exercise material and even the contents page of their course book.

Ken Wilson has written about 30 ELT books, of which ten are coursebooks, including Smart Choice (OUP). He has also written a hundred radio and TV programmes for BBC English. Until 2002, Ken was artistic director of the English Teaching Theatre. His most recent book is Drama and Improvisation (OUP).
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Posters: Abstracts and Bios


The Study-abroad Wiki: Integrating overseas study into the overall language curriculum

by Michael Carroll (Momoyama Gakuin University, Japan)

Theme: Higher Education & Learning Technologies.

This poster will describe an innovative attempt to create a seamless three-stage overseas study experience for Japanese university students. Three groups of students - those preparing to study abroad, those currently studying abroad, and those just returned from studying abroad - reflect on their experiences and interact with each other through a wiki-type website. We will discuss to what extent this collaborative learning environment integrating grammatical and lexical learning, cultural learning and motivation, combined with clear objectives and core vocabulary lists can support the development of self- and peer-assessment skills and independent learning strategies.

Michael Carroll has been teaching English for 20 years, including 10 in Japan. He is the editor of a recent book on Curriculum, published by TESOL. He is currently working with students before, during and after their overseas semester, trying to help them make the most of their experiences.

Investigating the Emergence Order of Apology Strategies

by Yuh-Fang Chang (National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan)

Theme: Intercultural issues and Adult Learners

This study examined the development of pragmatic competence in L2 apologies produced by Chinese learners of English of different proficiency levels to determine whether the emergence of apology strategies follows a certain order. The participants comprised four groups: 3rd grade, 6th grade, and 10th grade students and college freshmen. The elicitation instrument used for data collection was the discourse completion questionnaire. The findings revealed that different types of apology strategy emerged in the apology of L2 learners of different proficiency level, which may indicate that there is a difficulty hierarchy in terms of linguistic features in apology strategies.

Yuh-Fang Chang is associate professor in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at National Chung Hsing University, where she teaches courses in applied linguistics. Her primary research interests are interlanguage pragmatics and bilingual education. Her publications have appeared in Language Testing, Language Sciences and Asia Pacific Educatin Review.
 

Storytelling? Young Learners? Limited Vocabulary? Why Not?

by Sylvie Dolakova (Freelance)

Theme: Young Learners & Teacher Training and Development.

It is a well known fact that children of a very early age, if properly guided, can absorb foreign language easily. Due to their curiosity they like stories. Are we, teachers, ready to teach English to very young learners through stories? This poster presents not only telling various stories to children but activities for them to listen to, comprehend, retell, compare the contents and remember phrazes by listening, acting, miming, fingerplay, drama, action games, songs. Participants will be given an opportunity to learn games for different ages. Welcome to the fascinating world of children's imagination!

Sylvie Dolakova, M.A., freelance teacher trainer, Czech Republic Teaching English in kindergarten, primary school, a teacher trainer. Designed many games for teaching English to very young children and schoolchildren. Books of English for children published in four countries. Member of Czech Association of English Teachers ATECR and Drama SIG Committee.
 

Clickers: A New Approach to Engaging Students in the ESL / EFL Classroom

by Parvanak "Pary" Fassihi (CELOP/Boston University)

Theme: Learning Technologies & Tried and Tested Classroom Techniques.

Student Response Systems, or clickers, when used with interactive pedagogies, are known to increase student interaction and consequently, student achievement in content domains such as math and physics. Clickers have both a hardware and software component that collects and displays student responses. Students use a small device, similar to a television remote control, to respond to multiple-choice questions. The overall results become instantaneously available to the audience in form of a pie chart or bar graph. The presenter will demonstrate the hardware and software component of the clickers and talk about its advantages in ESL / EFL classes.

This poster presenter also presents a talk.

Pary Fassihi is an ESL Senior Lecturer at the Center for Language and Orientation Programs (CELOP) at Boston University. She has 13 years of experience teaching ESL / EFL. Her specialization is the use of technology in ESL / EFL classes. She is currently pursuing her doctoral degree in Language Education at Boston University.

IF IF IF... To IF or not to IF, that is the question

by Igor Gavilán (Eibar Idiomas Hizkuntzak, Spain)

Theme: Classroom Techniques & Grammar and Vocabulary

A combination of visuals, attached examples plus the analysis of the poem IF by Rudyard Kipling will smoothly transfer you into the magic world of teaching conditional sentences in English. This poster presentation will certainly turn out to be of great interest for teachers and others who realise that using conditional sentences in an appropriate and effective way is absolutely crucial in our lives. Let's use the right conditional sentences! As R. Kipling puts it: If you can... yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, and, which is more- you'll be a Man, my son!

Igor Gavilán graduated in English at the University of Deusto (Bilbao) where he also completed a course on Pedagogy. He has been working as a qualified English teacher over the last 15 years. He is currently a lecturer and the director of his own school of languages where he has successfully prepared students for all the Cambridge Exams and, consequently, has been awarded a certificate by the University of Cambridge. He is a member of TESOL-SPAIN.

Teachers' Language Learning Experiences

by Maidy Giber (University of South Australia)

Theme: Intercultural Issues & Teacher Training and Development

Language teachers have also been, or are still language learners. There has been little examination of this relationship (eg Lorties' 1975 study considers learning in general, not language learning. Teachers' natural preferences for teaching are influenced as much by their own language learning experiences. This poster will combine theory and practical discussion regarding this subject.

Maidy Giber has taught ESL, French, Spanish, education and applied linguistics for over 15 years. She has currently researched ESL and FLE teachers' language learning experiences with a view towards intercultural issues.

Using Audacity to Optimize Your Listening Sessions

by Susana Gómez and Anisoara Pop, TESOL Spain, and Dimitrie Cantemir, University of Targu Mures, Romania

Theme: Learning Technologies.

This poster provides a step-by-step guidance on performing common tasks using Audacity, a free, open source software for recording and editing sounds which will be of great help for the language teacher. The poster will cover the following sections: 1. Introduction to Audacity and its functions 2. How to download the programme for free 3. How to record and edit audio with audacity 4. Transferring tapes and records to computer or CD and recording audio playing on the computer 5. Working with audacity: practical activities and suggestions for the language classroom.

Dr. Susana Gómez is a member of the Board of TESOL Spain, the Director of Publications of TESOL SPAIN Newsletter and she currently teaches English at the Faculty of Translation and Interpreting at the University of Valladolid (Spain). Her research interests are second language teaching and learning. Anisoara Pop has been teaching English for 22 years at primary school and university level (Business English). Anisoara has a PhD in linguistics and is currently preoccupied with teaching with the New Technologies.

Increasing Your Students' Reading Speed

by Beverly J. Hearn (University of Tennessee at Martin)

Theme: Tried and Tested Classroom Techniques & Language Testing

Many English language learners approach dense and difficult text feeling defeated before they even begin. Even worse, they face this type of text when they must take exit exams which include a reading section. However, English Language Learners can be helped by learning techniques to increase their reading speed without sacrificing comprehension. If you have not yet addressed the speed component of language fluency in your classroom, this demonstration will give you some effective and motivational techniques.

Beverly J. Hearn, Ed.D., taught English as a Second Language in Jackson, Tennessee, and is a past president of Tennessee TESOL. At present she is Director of the Reading Center and Assistant Professor of Educational Studies at the University of Tennessee at Martin.

Teaching Reading to ESL Dyslexic Students

by Monika Lodej (IATEFL Poland)

Theme: Learner Styles

Reading is a vital skill without which a child cannot succeed in virtually any other area. In Europe the competence in English is of key importance. Schools recognize that need by introducing EFL courses on obligatory bases. Teaching English as a foreign language to dyslexic students poses additional challenge to educators. The poster offers a presentation of teaching tools such as language drills and various reading strategies that can enhance reading skills in dyslexic learners of English as a foreign language. Main characteristics of dyslexia with reference to dual-route model of reading aloud will be touched upon to support the need for overlearning in dyslexic learners.

Monika Lodej has an MA in English Studies, and is currently working on a PhD dissertation (applied linguistics) at Warsaw University focusing on reading competence in Polish dyslexic EFL learners. She works in the English Department at Holy Cross University in Kielce, running courses on EFL methodology and didactics. She is a member of IATEFL Poland and the mother of a dyslexic child and a tutor of dyslexic students.

The Pathology of Demotivation and Amotivation in Language Learning Context: A Case Study

by Mojtaba Mohammadi (Islamic Azad University, Roudehen Branch, Iran)

Theme: Adult Learners & Learner styles

This study aims at investigating the origin of learning disabilities, underlining the affective factors of demotivation and amotivation, of Shiva, an Iranian girl, in pursuing her language learning. To diagnose different aspects of her disabilities, different research instruments like MSQ, WTC Questionnaires, and proficiency test were administered. The results of five-month observation and interview indicate that demotivation is more detrimental than amotivation in language learning context. Also, demotivation is caused mostly due to the misconduct of the teachers in not only their teaching techniques but also their misuse of motivational strategies.

Mojtaba Mohammadi is a faculty member at Islamic Azad University, Roudehen Branch. He is currently a PhD candidate at Science and Research Branch, Tehran. He has taught English for 12 years. His areas of interest include testing and assessment, teacher training, and writing skill.

Interdisciplinary Relations in the Primary Classroom

by Zhivka Ilieva (Shumen University, Dobrich College, Bulgaria)

Theme: Young Learners & Adult Learners

Handouts

This poster demonstrates various opportunities for integrating English language teaching with other subjects in the curriculum and making interdisciplinary relations. It accentuates primarily on using English in Arts and Crafts classes, in Physical Education classes and relating English to Music through songs. The poster includes making postcards, practising the imperative and having fun while learning and practising English through its relations to other subjects.

Zhivka Ilieva is a teacher of English and a teacher trainer. Assistant professor, PhD in Dobrich College, Shumen University, Bulgaria.

Language Exams Based on CEFR at Tallinn University: A two-year experience

by Tuuli Oder (Tallinn University Language Centre, Estonia)

Theme: Language Testing & Higher Education

Tallinn University Language Centre started teaching foreign languages (11 different ones at the moment) following the principles and guidelines of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) two years ago. While finding the proper teaching material and coursebooks for different levels for each language was not a very big problem, testing and assessment following the same principles on the contrary turned out to be really difficult. This poster gives an overview of how we tackled the problem and organised the process from teacher education to final testing.

Tuuli Oder is head of the Tallinn University Language Centre, had a long experience both as teacher and teacher educator and is head of the counselling board on EFL matters at the Ministry of Education of Estonia.

Watching Films Is More Than Fun

by Carme Porcel (Freelance, Spain)

Theme: Adult Learners & Young Learners

Watching a film is great fun but, beyond that, it is an excellent way of enlarging our students' cultural knowledge and it's a perfect resource to learn vocabulary and expressions which are not in textbooks and which are really useful. Working with films can make your classes more attractive and let your students get in touch with the real English spoken by people in their everyday lives. What kind of films to watch, creating your own worksheets, taking the most profit from a film, how to use films in the English class... We'll talk about it.

Carme Porcel is a secondary school teacher at IES Abat Oliba, Ripoll in Girona, Spain. She has been teaching English for 20 years now and has a long experience in creating her own materials and worksheets. Great supporter of active, motivating and creative English classes. She's specialized in working with films in class. She's given several talks on the topic in Girona, at the APAC ELT Convention (Barcelona), at the APIGA annual conference in Galicia and at the British Council (Barcelona).

Student Presentations: Making them beneficial and worthwhile for everyone!

by Marianne Raynaud (TESOL France - Grenoble Coordinator)

Theme: Higher Education & Teacher Training and Development

Most teachers have their students do presentations. We will look at various types, both informal and formal, that lead to effective language acquisition. Above all, we will consider strategies that involve active participation from all the members of a class and not just the speakers. Short films will be shown with students interacting in class. A 15-page handout in the form of digital files with instructions, explanations, and examples (from the book QualityTime-ESL: The Digital Resource Book) will be available to teachers who come and see the poster. Teachers will be invited to test this material with their students and to share their experiences at a later date. A workshop on this theme with Marianne Raynaud will be organized in Paris this coming year.

Marianne Raynaud, coordinator of TESOL France-Grenoble, taught twenty-four years at France's largest technological university, INPG, winning the prestigious Palmes Académiques for innovations in teaching ESL. She founded www.qualitytime-esl.com, airs podcasts Better Speaking Skills on iTunes and has written QualityTime-ESL: The Digital Resource Book, an extensive toolbox of teaching materials.

Bringing Motivation Back to the Classroom

by Semra Sadik and Fatma Sadik (Cukurova University, Turkey)

Theme: Adult Learners & Teacher Training and Development.

Why does some of language learners' initial motivation gradually decrease during the preparatory year English language programme providing an opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to learn or improve their English? Is it because they face a variety of demotivational influences or do they have prejudice about language learning that teachers cannot change? In this presentation, presenters share the results of a descriptive study on motivation in terms of students' motivational beliefs and motivational self-regulation strategies. The presenters will also invite the audience to discuss issues and teachers' motivational strategies to overcome affective barriers for continuous language learning.

As a graduate of Cukurova University in 1999, Semra Sadik got her MA in TEFL in 2005. She was an EFL / ESL teacher in Foreign Languages Center until 2007. Now she works at the International Office, Cukurova University as international students advisor. Her interests are curriculum development, testing and learning strategies.
Fatma Sadik graduated from the Faculty of Education, Cukurova University, in 1996. She got her MA and PhD in Education Sciences in 2000 and 2006. She has been working as a lecturer at the same faculty since 1998. Her interests are curriculum development, classroom management, teacher education and environmental education.

Focusing on Vocabulary and Grammar Learning in a Writing Exchange Project

by Kayo Shirasaka (Miyazaki Prefectural Nursing University, Japan)

Theme: Adult Learners

Since 2006, a group of EFL teachers have been conducting a Moodle-based writing exchange project among seven nursing colleges and departments in six countries. In 2008, under this project, Japanese students were required to write over 2500 English words, while parallely receiving in-class grammar instructions. This study aimed at determining whether the incorporation of explicit grammar teaching is effective in increasing the participants' understanding of English grammar and vocabulary. The results demonstrated that communicative expressions, such as politeness markers and formulaic phrases, are learned more easily than phrases with relatively greater grammatical complexity.

Kayo Shirasaka received her Masters degree in Education from the University of Miyazaki, Japan. She now teaches various EFL courses at the University of Miyazaki, Civil Aviation College and the Miyazaki Prefectural Nursing University. Her main research interests are EFL pedagogy, extensive reading, and teaching English to young learners.
 

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